Limping Duck Farm

A Family Farm

Kune Kune Pigs

Our Breeding Pigs

Newton – RBOW Te Whangi 1

Hopper – BVF Rebecca Gina 8

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Fossey – USA Jenny 51

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Why We Chose Kune Kune Pigs:

After raising 3 pigs for slaughter on our 5 acre farm we quickly realized that we would need to change our expectations about pig farming.  The pigs were a cross between American Guinea Hog and Large Black Hog (I know, a weird mix).  The pigs were constantly testing the fencing and escaped several times.  They were also destructive and dangerous around our small children.  In short, the chilled out farm turned into a pool of anxiety.  But I have come to learn that that is what farming is about.  Make a plan, execute that plan, probably fail at that plan, alter that plan.

After hours of research we came across Karin at Iron Horse Farm in Olympia, WA.  She has successfully raised Kune Kune pigs for years and was a valuable resource for us.  We bought Hopper and Newton from her in April, 2016 and they have quickly become the favorite animals on the farm.  They are gentle and social.  Newton loves a good belly rub and Hopper is an excellent mother.  They don’t root the pasture, they eat about a cup of food a day while foraging on grass the rest of the day.

If you choose Kune Kune pigs for your farm, I am sure you will be just as happy with them as we are.

Standard of Perfection:

Updating of the Standard of Perfection for the Kunekune Pig breed is intended to provide a clear description of Kunekune characteristics for pasture, pork, and progeny.

When Kunekune Pigs are judged in the show ring, these characteristics and how well each pig displays them shall be the basis for awarded points and placement.  Consideration of the head is of paramount importance when evaluating the breed.  Head type identifies the breed as a grazer not prone to root and is considered unique to the breed.  Judges please note the weightiness given to head type.

General Appearance:

  • Form:  Relatively long, level, and deep.  Boars weighing up to 300 pounds and sows up to 250 pounds, the result of a thick cover of firm flesh and fat.

  • Quality: Uniform covering of hair, clean skin, medium/heavy bone, even covering of flesh and fat.

  • Condition:  Overall appearance shall be one of balance.  Deep uniform covering of flesh and fat especially in regions of valuable cuts.

 Characteristics:

  • Head:  Broad.  Face dished.  Short, upturned snout and teeth suitable for grazing.  Medium to heavy jowl, not wasty.  20 points.

  • Ears:  Pricked to semi-lopped, inclined forward.  5 points

  • Wattles:  Two, well-formed and well-attached.  10 points

  • Neck:  Short to medium.  5 points

  • Body:  Shoulders level and in proportion to rump.  Chest moderately wide    between the legs.  Deep girth.  Well formed hams.  10 points

  • Back: Strong, level or slightly arched.  5 points

  • Tail:  Curled, crooked.  None straight.  Set high.  5 points

  • Legs:  Short to medium, straight, strong.  Pasterns upright.  10 points

  • Feet:  Medium, closed and even.  10 points

  • Skin/Hair: Clean coat of any color, texture, or pattern except for belted.  Belted pigs shall be disqualified from the show ring.  5 points

  • Temperament:  Placid in nature.  5 points

  • Sexual Characteristics: MALE–boars should be strong in traits peculiar to the sex.  Head may be slightly coarse, the neck full and arched somewhat, with the shoulder heavy.  The forequarters are usually slightly heavier than the hind quarters and this distinction grows more evident with age as shields develop.  Strength of frame without coarseness is desirable.  Body should be deep, long, and low.  Strong, short/medium legs with straight pasterns.  At least 10 evenly placed teats. FEMALE–after breed type, sex type is of first and foremost importance in sows.  She shall have no sign   of coarseness instead being feminine in overall appearance, neat, and sharp.  The width before and behind should be almost uniform.  Length of body abundant for growing litters and easy farrowing.  She shall possess at least 10 evenly spaced teats, none blind. 10 points Possible points:  100

Helpful Links:

http://www.americankunekunepigregistry.com/

http://www.americankunekunepigsociety.com/

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